Stuff I've Been Eating Lately

Grocery haul

Spoiler alert: Still not a food blogger (I actually still don't consider this a blog, more a tedious diary I force on innocent strangers). N'importe quoi. The single pot meals appearing here are cheap, gluten free, vegan, and easy to throw together quickly on a weeknight. 
If you're searching for a helpful grocery list and meal plan, search elsewhere. Kathryn's been sharing an incredibly useful step-by-step zero waste meal guide, replete with pretty pictures. But in the interest of transparency, if you want lazy blogging, plus an unvarnished glimpse at the gross looking, meatless, largely plastic free meals I force my husband to eat every night (he likes them, I promise), this is your post. Now featuring three different sized fonts! 
I bought lentils, gluten free vegan pasta, sesame seeds, two kinds of rice, chick peas, black beans, peanuts, shredded coconut, and cashews in bulk, one drawstring linen produce bag each, for 17 euro. The only herbs were a bundle each of mint, basil, and coriander for 1 euro- I had cloves and cinnamon and pepper on hand from a friend. For fresh produce, I purchased a filet bag of baby greens, a head of lettuce, six carrots, a filet bag of peas, a pomegranate, three lemons, eight zucchini, four onions, two sweet potato, three white potatoes, one bulb purple garlic, a bundle of beets and radishes, red and green chili, one watermelon, two tomatoes, two handfuls cherry tomatoes, an avocado, three peaches, four oranges, a head of broccoli, two cucumber, and two handfuls beans for 25 euro. I'm just realizing reading this that I always ask for deux poignées of loose produce. 
Olive oil comes in bulk here- one liter costs 9 euro- and we already had tamari and sriracha, which I still buy in recyclable packaging. All ingredients are organic, and in these quantities we got six servings out of each meal. TL,DR: My basic strategy is to keep a minimalist selection of dry goods / spices and buy lots of fresh produce, which we finish more quickly.


 
Lentils, carrots, and zucchini cooked in cinnamon, clove, olive oil, onions, and garlic with fresh pepper, raw cashews, and coriander served on red rice. Pomegranate on baby green mix purchased loose from Causses (it's cheaper to just buy a whole head of lettuce though) with leftover beet and radish greens, cucumber, raw beets, and homemade hummus.

 
Cucumber, tomato, black beans, and coriander with fresh pepper and olive oil. Radish, zucchini, onion, sesame seeds, lentils, and a head of broccoli cooked in one pot with lentil pasta and tamari.

 
Chickpeas, tomatoes, sweet potatoes, zucchini, and coriander cooked with onions and red chili pepper in bulk shredded coconut and water. Rice, peas, green chili pepper, and tomatoes cooked in one pot with bulk shredded coconut and fresh coriander (squeezed lemon on top before serving).

Chickpeas, zucchini, bulk shredded coconut, and green chili cooked in one pot with rice, topped with olive oil, fresh coriander, and a squeeze of lemon.

 
These were supposed to be lettuce wraps but I got too lazy and shredded the lettuce. Fresh mint, coriander, avocado, and bulk peanuts with sriracha (in addition to tamari and sriracha, I buy rice paper wrappers in recyclable packaging). Bulk vegan, gluten free pasta with sliced cherry tomatoes, fresh basil, olive oil, and fresh pepper. The vegan cheese from America is not necessary and frankly was not so good. It didn't even melt!

Zucchini, basil, cherry tomatoes, and butter beans sauteed in olive oil. Potatoes, peas, onions, and zucchini stewed in olive oil with tomato, shredded coconut, clove, cinnamon, and red chili- I call this "fake aloo matar." A favorite of dinner guests, they don't even miss the meat.

Note: All meals seasoned or cooked with fresh pressed garlic. I eat out more now that I live in a cheaper neighborhood with more gluten free, vegan options, but it's usually limited to once or twice a week. We primarily eat at home still, especially for weeknight dinners.

Paris to Go

14 comments:

  1. Cool another post ! The innocent strangers like very much reading your non-blog :-) I really should translate your recipes, or I will have to search pomegranate AGAIN on linguee, and some others...

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    1. Ok this year I will start doing posts in French too (I actually translate for work sometimes which sounds strange), I've been here long enough to know its grenade lol! You are so sweet Pandore!

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  2. Admittedly I sometimes Google translate some of your French to ensure I'm not missing out on a very wry but entertaining tone in your writing :)

    I actually really like your food summaries and run downs. It translates better in a 'what can I do with this ingredient - oh duh, that was so simple' way, rather thank trawling through how you want an ingredient to taste, and what brings out the flavour, and the whole motivation behind the recipe. Yours is wham, bam, thank you ma'am, straight into my tummy!

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    1. Lol I always hate the prose behind recipes that I have to scroll through when I'm hungry and just want to figure out to do with an ingredient. Also I never use recipes so I just prefer getting straight to the point lol. My friend Paris By Vegan has a great ebook that is still fun but she doesn't mess around, it gets directly to the recipes and I love that!

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  3. I'm following all of the recipes here, loving the ideas. I follow low FODMAP, so I not only am gluten free, but there is a whole list of other things I have to pull out of recipes. Even so, I'm loving the ideas I get here. Also loving there are not 9 million crazy ingredients I would have to buy for only one recipe. Keep them coming, girl. Love it. Marta :)

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    1. Thank you so much Marta I'm so happy this is helpful!

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  4. Ariana,

    Your food explains why you could use the dish scrub brush for cleaning. I make stews and other hearty Indian food. And the brush never seems to be able to clean my dishes. It also sheds a lot when I apply force. I reverted back to the grocery store sponge. Any suggestions for a more heavy duty zero waste dish scrub ?

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    1. Hi Archana! Which brand brush do you use again? When I used to cook meats (I make Indian food but not like you, I do make a bunch of Thai stews though) and cheeses I would use a little baking soda with my brush, more to soak up the grease so the brush could do the rest of the job. The Redecker brushes serve me well with little bristle loss, the Lola bamboo brush Bea Johnson uses is the best one but the head is glued on so I switched to the reusable redecker. A lot of zero wasters like steel wool too, although depending on your dish material it may not be the best option.

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    2. Ariana,

      This is the one I used : https://amzn.com/B008J4SXOE and it felt hopeless. I will give Lola brush a go. I use enameled cast iron and steel pots.

      Thank you for the ideas. Will try again.

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    3. Oh yes I did hear that complaint with the boar bristle brushes. I don't know why the plant ones stay in better-maybe because they're rougher they slip out less easily? Let me know how that brush works otherwise I'll do more research

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  5. You're too sweet. But, seriously - these meals look gorgeous. I love simple food. I just love food. It's so colorful! And, I'd let you cook for me any day of the week - I'll bring the wine? ;)

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  6. These look great and make me feel like our meals are more normal. :) This is the way to do zero-waste + simple for me too! Thank you for sharing!

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