My Outfits


This post has been updated. Click here to see my current wardrobe.

These photos are a joke, but here are my grown-up Garanimals. As can be expected, having a few well-loved, multitasking pieces forces me to get creative with styling and combinations. Finding new ways to wear them keeps my wardrobe from getting stale. Note: I know it seems wasteful to use my Macbook to take pictures when the city I live in is essentially one giant backdrop for fashion bloggers. I'm not a fashion blogger, though, and I'm horribly un-photogenic and uncomfortable in front of the camera, so I decided to shoot these with help from two fluffy assistants. Toffel appears throughout and Kar mostly just sat on my clothes.

The items


Khaki cotton dress, secondhand, similar here
Black silk-lined virgin wool skirt, secondhand, similar here
Black patent pumps, secondhand, here
Nude patent pumps, secondhand, here
Waterproof leather boots, here
Green J. Crew cotton t-shirt with silk trim, thrifted, similar here
J. Brand Heartbreaker jeans, thrifted
Gap Pure Body grey cotton t-shirt, thrifted
Pink fitted dress
Navy silk-lined 100% wool dress, secondhand, here
Red silk-lined dress, secondhand, same style in grey here 
Gap modal dress, thrifted, similar
here
Nike Sky Hi dunks
Wool-cashgora coat, secondhand, similar here
Uniqlo beige cotton cardigan, secondhand, not pictured
Longchamp Le Pliage sac shopping small, secondhand, not pictured
Green trench coat, secondhand, not pictured. Similar here
Sunglasses, not pictured, same model in tortoise here
Wedding ring, gold infinity ring gifted from my sister, and watch

These are all the clothes and accessories I have now. Imagine t-shirts over the black dress, and sneakers, a cardigan, or trench coat with each item, and you have all my outfits, year-round. I sold my green sandals, grey pumps, and three dresses, consolidated into black heels and a modal dress. My at-home wardrobe consists of that dress, t-shirts, leggings, and jeans, but with a change of shoes they're ready for the pool, running errands, dinner with friends, etc. I prefer to let the subtle details of each garment, like pretty folds and strategic pleating, standalone instead of adding separate accessories.

 

Apart from my linen t-shirts, nothing needed replacement. I only mended an unraveling seam on the pink dress. We'll see how long the cotton t-shirts hold up. The Gap one has tiny holes where Kar massaged my stomach, which is too bad, because I love the fit and opaqueness of it. In Paris, it's popular to wear loose tops tucked into skinny pants cropped at the ankles, but that makes me look stumpy. I stick to a reverse silhouette: figure-skimming on top, slightly flared on the bottom (I can always roll my jeans if I decide to try the cropped look). I like pants hemmed to graze sneakers and heels, so I can wear boots under or over them. Proportion is paramount- waistlines just below the ribcage, mid-length skirts and t-shirts cut into hips. 

It seems stupid to switch shoes and call it a new outfit, yet people do ask sometimes if I bought something new or I'm wearing something different. Well-chosen shoes change the way you carry an item- the way you stand, the way a garment hangs. They're an easy way to freshen a wardrobe without buying much. I'm pretty happy with my clothes and find myself falling in love with old favorites again. It helps that I don't feel the need to stand out all the time. While nobody seems to notice if I repeat an item, my purposeful non-style has the unexpected effect of being a little subversive. Click here or here to see how I wear these pieces in the real world; here and here to see how these adapt for winter.

Paris to Go

77 comments:

  1. Brrr… I'm looking these photos and my arms are so cooold :-S

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  2. Stunning! I'm actually quite surprised by how youthful these items look when they're being worn. I couldn't quite picture it before. Love that you have a different, elegant style than what's in the mainstream at the moment. I still love my separates and layers but I'd be lying if I said I didn't long for the time when people dressed up a little more. I would love to see more photos of these outfits as you go about your daily life. They definitely have editorial quality so it'd be fun to see them in their natural environment, so to speak.

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    1. Thank you so much! I'm glad they look youthful to you. Sometimes I think I dress like a 70 year old woman, but I just love the way elderly people dress sometimes, it's so formal and neat and put-together. One of my French friends is dating a friend from Ohio, and this summer we were talking about how people dress where we're from and the person's style everybody loved was a 90 year old man in custom tailored three piece suits and handkerchiefs that matched all his ties, plus cool shoes from the 1940s.

      I actually had some friends who tried photographing my outfits for this blog... I looked terrible in the pictures. I'll keep trying though, to show how they work in daily life. Thank you!

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  3. These are incredibly gorgeous, thank you for sharing. Your ladylike style is so unique. The best part of thrifting is finding those one-of-a-kind items.

    Do you abide by a one in, one out rule for your wardrobe? I'm also curious to see if a minimalist or capsule approach involves more of an up-front investment, since you have to buy a perfect item that lasts longer than a more affordable option. I did not expect your pieces to be so interchangeable, as I see now, and the quality is evident in the way they fit. I get a little sticker shock when I look at the price tags of most of your clothes, but it has inspired me to start wearing more dresses and be more formal in my approach to my work / errands wardrobe.

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    1. Hi Tamara! You are always so nice. I don't abide by that rule usually and I only count my items for blog posts. Sometimes this rule can be justification for lots of shopping because it's easy to think purchases aren't a problem if the overall number of items stays the same. So, it's better not to fix on a number, but my rule is I keep what I love and eliminate what I don't.

      I only bought four of these things from the Real Real, all under $200, which is what I'd pay at a mall. The rest was thrifted so I usually spent $3-10 per item, the exception being the beige shirtdress, bag, and coat. I try to avoid rigid perfectionism and buy on a love at first sight basis. Tastes change, so a small wardrobe can't be so restrictive that you can't get a different item to suit what you love right now or in response to a lifestyle adjustment. It's a lot of pressure to put on yourself, committing to one piece forever, and can lead to buying more expensive items than you would normally.

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  4. Your black skirt has convinced me to go and get a proper tailored skirt and not try to justify a stretchy elastane Victoria's Secret as being sufficient (it isn't, I've been trying to convince myself it is, but it really is terrible! Yours just gives such perfect shape). And I too love fitted top and gently flared bottom. I inherited my dad's wonderful short distance sprinting thighs, so flared at bottom is really the most flattering :)

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    1. Ooh, I hope you will write about it when you find it! I love that silhouette, and it's different from the norm right now. Thanks for your comment, you always have such interesting insights!

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  5. Those shoes! I hadn't realized how Dita von Teese-esque those dresses looked when styled. Brilliant putting the skirt on top of your dresses. I never would have thought of that and it actually looks really fun, work-appropriate and fashion forward. Of course, your cat is too cute :-D

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    1. Toffel is the best :) Thank you so much Lindsay!

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  6. I never would have thought dresses could be this versatile. It looks like you’re actually wearing the clothes, as opposed to the other way around, and you’re not trying to emulate anyone else’s style. Surprisingly, your items look more « street » than I previously thought. On the hangers they look conservative, but on you the lovely details stand out.

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  7. the red dress has a beautiful neckline

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    1. Thank you so much! I could wear it backwards and inside out and no one would notice I think, the construction is really nice.

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  8. Omg. I LOVE the look with the green long dress and the green sneakers. Awesome.

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    1. Thank you so much! I was so inspired by your style actually!

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  9. Coucou,

    Très jolie jupe, trop mignonne!

    Gros bisous
    Aurore

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  10. This post is fabulous! I like seeing a list of the clothes items, and I like seeing a photo of each separate item, but I really need to see a post like this one in order to see the wardrobe in action, really helps me understand how the wardrobe really works. Thanks for doing this!

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    1. Thank you so much Glenda! I love seeing lists of clothes items too :)

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  11. Absolutely in love with that red dress!

    www.stinefriis.com

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  12. It's really interesting to see your wardrobe. (I love posts where bloggers show their wardrobes.) The red dress is fabulous, as is your coat.

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    1. Thank you Xin! I don't know who decided to get rid of those two items but I'm glad they did. I love looking at people's closets and clothing on blogs too!

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  13. Forty outfits from fourteen items. That's pretty impressive! I love that you're laughing and smiling in some of your pictures rather than making the standard fashion blogger faces #fishgape

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    1. Thank you so much Cassie ! It sounds stupid but I was laughing and smiling because my cats were doing funny stuff. I cannot do fashion blogger faces or poses or photography, so may as well smile :)

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  14. Based on previous posts, don't you have a Leica? Couldn't your husband or a friend snap pictures of you instead? Or you could put it on a tripod and use a remote. This just seems like lazy blogging to me.

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    1. We do, but to buy a tripod and remote for it for one post seemed like a waste to me. My wardrobe doesn't change much, and blogging isn't my job, so I don't hold myself to the same standard a fashion blogger might. It is lazy blogging since I only spent half an hour on this, but I don't have any aspirations in the field anyway. My husband works and I don't want to bother him with outfit photos. Actually, some of my friends are fashion and street style photographers and they always try taking pictures of me but I get so nervous in front of the camera! The Macbook is nice and blurry so it covers a multitude of flaws.

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  15. Don't listen to that comment. Your unpolished shots are refreshing :)

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    1. Agree. Just grateful you take the time to share and inspire- I'm sure we're all mentally capable of getting the idea without art shots.

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  16. Just ignore that comment, Ariana. Those pics are lovely.I love your blog! Since I started reading your blog, I had cleared out my closet quite a bit and left the pieces which I think are of great quality. Only kept natural fabrics. I have also changed my shopping habits and only shop for the things I actually need, rather than buying things just because they are on sale. Sold a bunch of books. Never thought I'd be able to part with books, but surprisingly feel lighter and more liberated with less stuff. Thank you!

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    1. Alina, that is so awesome. You are amazing! Thank you so much for reading and letting me know, your comment made me so happy :)

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  17. Thank you so much for displaying your ensembles! I love seeing them put together as I've never understood how you managed to make do with so few (beautiful and high quality) items. I love how you layer your skirt over dresses for additional looks. I've tried to do that and I always feel like the dress adds too much bulk or peeks out from under the skirt. You do not seem to have this problem. It is very inspiring to see your outfits. It reminds me that I can reduce much, much more. Do you have any suggestions beyond Marie Kondo, LightbyCoco and your blog for reducing and defining style. I believe that my problem is not having a well defined sense of "my style". Embarrassingly, I still buy, albeit less. Ahhh...well, thank you for continuing to be an inspiration for me to love living on less and being more thoughtful. P.S. I love your assistant's outfit. Very, very fine.

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    1. Hi Amber! I hope you are doing well, you must be so happy to be done with school and exams! And Toffel thanks you, he's sending love to your cats too :)

      Into Mind is the only one that I know of which focuses specifically on defining style and minimalism. There are lots of helpful exercises to define style in practical ways.

      This may sound crazy, but for reducing, have you ever tried a cleanse? I was just thinking that people do juice cleanses where they only drink the same thing for a few days- is there a favorite outfit that you could adopt as a uniform of sorts for a few days? And then afterwards the effects would be the same as a juice cleanse- maybe you'd feel lighter, fresher, and be able to look at what you need with new clarity... or this theory could be totally insane; I know if I ever did a juice cleanse I'd probably binge eat after. I was just thinking that many people are willing to diet, so it might be interesting to apply that willpower to clothes... I haven't thought the whole thing through yet.

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    2. I Love Your Style: How to Define and Refine Your Personal Style by Amanda Brooks is another good one.

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    3. also things a woman should know about style by karen homer!

      ariana, i'm curious, how did you stumble upon your personal style? did you fill out the charts on into-mind? i am in the same boat as amber right now but wading through quizzes and worksheets seems a bit academic and daunting.

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    4. I am enjoying days without exams and homework, but there is so much to learn in the workplace!

      Fashion diet! What an idea....I do have a sort of Project 333 thing going on and I only have about 20 items in rotation atm. The problem that I face is that I have a work style and a casual style...and the weather here (this time of year) in North Florida is so goofy with one day hot and humid the next quite cool. Last week I almost put together a new capsule, for Fall but the afternoon hit 85 F and I abandoned the idea. One day I'd like to figure out a season-less capsule like yours....I think I will put myself on a sort of "diet"....you...don't...know...how...hard...this...is......I think a "no buy" until the New Year is in order (except a pair of work shoes). Ok. Now that I've said it, I've got to stick with it. Wish me luck. Please compose tons of posts on your wardrobe and how you found yourself at a place where you do not feel the need to shop! I'm going to savor every one of them.

      Thanks to the ladies above that gave me suggestions on defining my style.

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    5. How does transition dressing work in North Florida, I wonder? It seems like it would be difficult to mix up your wardrobe between seasons in that kind of climate.

      Margaret, I've never used charts or quizzes admittedly. I don't know if I have a style so much, or if I'm just dressing not to stand out. It's kind of a reaction to the attention-getting, layered hi-lo aesthetic of street style pictures that's so popular today, and has the opposite effect of making me stand out more, I've noticed. Like women come up to me and say how nice it is to see a young person dressed up, and then schoolgirls say they wish they could wear more skirts to school but they're afraid of getting funny looks. It was trial and error and the fact that I always liked dresses that led me to the look I have now. I don't feel the urge to experiment with my style very often. I just want to look nice, and wear clothes that I love. Right now, these fit the bill, I think.

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    6. A post on transition dressing would be nice too. I'm unclear, do you wear your light-colored and sleeveless dresses year-round? I seem to recall in another post that you only wore some dresses in summer and spring only?

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    7. Hi Susanna, originally, yes, but I realized that the khaki dress worked with boots, my wool skirt, under a coat or cardigan, and with black shoes year-round. So it's remained a part of my rotation in colder months. I no longer have two summer-only linen and cotton dresses, and have been wearing the modal dress under my coats and cardigan now that it's cold and wet in Paris. Maybe in the summer I'll feel like something light and bright but for now I like dresses that are versatile in all seasons and match all my shoes, not just some!

      My transition dressing formula is basically to put a coat on- and boots if it's raining :)

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    8. The book Cheap Chic is the best guide I've seen to defining style. Many helpful inspirational interviews and formulas. Into Mind borrowed graphic ideas and concepts from that book, I noticed, only packaged in a manner more appealing to Pinterest users.

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  18. I wish I could have bought those green sandals!

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    1. Oh no! I'm sorry :) It's time I give something away on the blog so next time maybe I will let everyone know!

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  19. What pants (leggings?) are you wearing in the third row of photos, second from the right, with the grey-shirt? They look great! I just can't find them in your clothing list and am curious. Thank you for the great post!

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    1. Hi Michelle! I totally forgot, those are my leggings. They are Wet Seal that I bought at a thrift store over ten years ago and still going strong!

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  20. I even see more than 40 outfits, because the skirt would look great over the red dress! I have to say when I was in France for a semester I saw many women in the skinny pant and blousy top uniform you described. It did not look great on every one but I appreciated their confidence and commitment to wearing it.

    I also noticed the French tended to repeat pieces more than we did in America, and my host family teased me for always wanting to do laundry, and packing so much! I think they thought I was nuts for carrying hand sanitizer around everywhere.

    Having been there, I can say that your forest green-navy-red-pink palette must stand out in a sea of black. Amazing how a few classic pieces can actually set you apart from the pack. I wish I'd been so bold to wear a little more color..... despite everything I brought, I found myself buying a whole new wardrobe once I got there, wanting to fit in!

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    1. That's interesting what you said about repeating pieces! Sometimes I'll wear one dress for a night and if it's clean I'll wear it the next day, I have two European friends who I've noticed doing the same thing and they are both super neat, really put-together women. Well, at least you had souvenirs from your semester in France then :) I do wear the skirt over the red dress occasionally, but I like the details on the dress so much I prefer not to cover it up! I'm a nerd for little details like hand-stitching and draped fabrics.

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  21. I do have a question about leggings. Do you wear yours out in public or are they home clothes? I only ask because I noticed your paired the tshirt with leggings and boots (divine silhouette by the way!) but there is always that nagging feeling in my mind about leggings and how they're not quite stockings/tights, but not quite pants. What's your take? Also, love the variation you made with a skirt over a dress! What a simple but effective idea.

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    1. Thank you so much! The leggings are home clothes, or I wear them under clothes. I only wear them out if I have a coat over them and know I won't be taking my coat off! Like if I'm running errands (boots or sneakers) or if I'm going to meet my husband on the terrace of some brasserie (heels). They're kind of a substantial fabric but I don't like wearing them as pants, it just reminds me of jeggings...

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    2. I'm curious (and I hope I'm not overstepping), is the reason you won't wear leggings as pants connected to your religion? I teach in a very conservative New England town, where leggings are a staple. The way most people choose pants, you'd think they were leggings too. However, I noticed that some bloggers are against wearing them outside the house due to their religious beliefs. As long as they are not sheer and the seat is covered, I don't see the issue, although I prefer not wearing them in public myself.

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    3. Hi Jessica! I wouldn't say it was connected to my religious beliefs- there are no prescriptions for what we can and can't wear, just the general principle of looking neat and modest. They are tighter than my personal preference usually allows for pants, and these leggings actually sag somewhat, so that's why I only wear them under stuff or around the house, where I don't mind having to pull them up all the time!

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    4. Thanks Ariana, you've cemented my belief that leggings just can't be justified as actual trousers! I can't bring myself to wear them outside of the house unless they're under a definite tunic or coat I am guaranteed not to take off, either. I liken them to the equivalent of stockings or long johns - worn underneath other garments but never as a garment in their own right. Camel toe and VPL galore otherwise, urgh :p

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  22. Your wardrobe is gorgeous! I ant get over the "luxe" and simplicity!

    But seriously, where do you buy all these high end designer second hand? I'm in ca and our local goodwill has nothing more than mall brands, and consignments seem to be a hit or miss (generally filled with very dated designer trends, not classic timeless as your wardrobe). Any tips you personally used? And how do you curb your appetite to buy mall clothes when you can't access the second hand high end goods?

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    1. I would be very interested in a post about this. The littles are finally old enough where I can have nice things to myself again and I'm not leaving Paris without some second-hand designer items. A post on strategies would be wonderful. In fact, I think it could be turned into another whole blog!

      I happen to like the naturalness of your photos. Combined with the tone of your writing, it's like reading a diary of an actual, normal fashionable person, instead of some staged editorial. Judging by the photos, it seems that we have a similar body type, so I hope you don't mind me asking, do you have to tailor everything you bought second-hand? What made you choose scoop-necks instead of v-necks? I was always taught that if you're big on top, you need v-necks, and I could never wear blouses or button-down dresses that weren't custom made because they gaped around the chest. The scoop looks great here, I'm just wondering if they could work for me, too. Tees would be a lot more practical for my lifestyle than having to buy a bespoke blouse!

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    2. Hi Sophia! Well, I think it's partly due to location. Somebody commented that in NYC it's hard to find designer items too, but every time I'm in Cleveland, where the stock is less picked over, I find tons of stuff. And of course, there's lots in Paris. First, I only shop if I need (or want) something specific. Then, my basic strategy is:

      1. Go to well-lit, edited stores, particularly ones organized by color or type of garment, so I don't have to wade through piles of garbage. I also hate messes, musty smells, and overstuffed clothing racks; something must have happened in my childhood to make me this way.

      2. Focus on the items I want to add to my wardrobe. I only look at the colors red, navy, hunter green, and neutrals like light pink, white, grey, beige, etc. That way I'm not in any danger of getting something that doesn't match. I used to wear a lot of purple but I don't like it anymore; the color does match with a lot of stuff, though I kind of look like a California Raisin in it.

      3. I don't go in searching for a particular label. I look at the fabric first- is it resilient, is it see-through, can I wash it- and I only see the label when I'm checking for things like a lining, the stitching, care tag, etc. I've been pleasantly surprised to find designer items this way, but on my last trip to Cleveland I bought three items that weren't designer and I like them a lot! If I'm shopping online, I will search only on secondhand sites and only for brands that I know are consistent in sizing and fit me well.

      If I really need something, and I find a piece that I like, I buy it whether it's designer or not. I only buy mall brands secondhand because their labor practices are horrible, and also because you never know how they're going to hold up unless you find them already washed and worn. That's how I ended up with my Uniqlo cardigan, although I need to stop buying their stuff secondhand because I never LOVE them and they always require more mending and maintenance than my quality wool or lined garments.

      I hope this answers your questions, let me know if I'm going in the wrong direction and I'll answer as best as I can! Thank you so much Jessica, you are so sweet. Maybe I will turn this into a post if I get the right photo and can flesh it out a little more :)

      When I first buy something, I generally do not get things that need additional tailoring because not everything can be altered, and when you buy secondhand you can't usually return items. I learned the hard way that things need to fit first when I thought I could thrift a blouse and get it taken in around the waist- a beautiful Valentino blouse that every tailor in Cleveland and Paris said they couldn't alter without destroying the seam detail. I still wore it, but it had to be tucked in and was a pain every time.

      I heard the same thing about crew necks but sometimes you try something on that theoretically shouldn't look good and it just works. For me, getting blouses custom made wasn't an option, financially, and I tried making one once and it looked like a chef's jacket. Anyway, I like the look of t-shirts, it makes my wardrobe look less precious.

      Everyone is going to hate me but I'm so excited to say that Sunday, my husband and I were looking at a long parka in a thrift store in Paris that was 35 euro and a great, durable waterproof fabric- and it turned out to be Dior! The sleeves even zip off to turn it into a sweater. It must be really old and it's been washed a bunch because the ink on the fabrication tag is nearly faded away. Still, it looks great, the style is timeless, and it's really heavy and warm.

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    3. Some people just have the magic touch. I look at the secondhand finds on the Purseblog Forum sometimes and it really is about being in the right place at the right time. It doesn't require a lot of digging always, either. I happen to find most of my designer secondhand on eBay. I work full time and thrift stores near me are not very appealing. The ones with all the high-end treasures are a 40 minute drive away, and I just can't stomach the hike. eBay has a lot of great deals without the high markup of consignment stores, and it doesn't necessarily take a lot of time if you know what designers you like and use the filters.

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    4. Could you do a post on secondhand shops in Paris?

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    5. Here is the post: http://www.paris-to-go.com/2015/01/paris-best-vintage-stores.html

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  23. Edit: I *can't get over the "luxe" AND simplicity. In the states it seems we confuse elegance with opulence. I think Europeans (and Ariana!) does elegant simplicity very well.

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  24. Ariana, I just received my copy of "A Guide to Elegance" by Genevieve Antoine Dariaux. So excited to read it!:)

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    1. Hi Alina! Ooh, tell me how you like it. It's one of the few books I actually enjoy re-reading.

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    2. I will definitely let you know when I finish the book:)

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  25. I want to thank you for two things- turning me on to Ferragamo Vara pumps, and to the idea of second hand shoes. I bought some Ferragamo loafers in Italy a few years ago, and they're insanely comfortable, so after seeing how much use you get from the Varas, I decided I wanted to try them. In Canadian dollars, I'd be out about $800, so I checked eBay and Kijiji, and managed to get 2 pairs- some nude ones, a little beat up, for cheap, and a pristine pair of black patent ones for still way less than half price. I LOVE THEM! So comfortable, you can walk miles in them, and they're perfect for work (that I have the shoe taste of a 70 year old Italian nonna doesn't hurt) Thanks for sharing, and giving me the idea!

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    1. Hi Lori, I never heard of Kijiji before, thanks for mentioning it, it sounds like you've found some amazing deals on there! I'm so glad you like the Varas. It's amazing how walkable they are. The story of Ferragamo is so interesting and he really studied anatomy so he makes shoes according to the way the foot is shaped and moves, which, surprisingly, is not the method of all shoemakers. The 70 year old Italian nonna quote made me laugh, but I know the feeling :)

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  26. Couldn't agree more about cropped pants. Most people don't realize they make the hips and butt look larger. They have to wear heels or boots to compensate for the effect.... or be naturally blessed!

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    1. I didn't realize that! Sometimes I hear French guys complaining about the "big" butts or thighs of girls that look perfectly normal to me. I guess that's why they complain? I'm always curious what their reaction would be if they were to visit a city where not everyone is a slim model-type...

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  27. Do you seek out designers when you go to thrift shops and if so, why? Are you concerned that perhaps the flaunting of designer goods may encourage materialism instead of minimalism, furthering consumption? In previous posts you wrote that you were still susceptible to designer goods and that you stopped reading fashion magazines. Was your previous reading an influence in your purchasing luxury products?

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    1. I don't seek them out, I look at the fabric and finishing before the label and they often turn out to be designer items. It just so happens that designer items are often the ones that last the longest. Some designer items were poor quality, but I was able to sell them once I realized that.

      I do have a pair of Wet Seal leggings that I've had for years. However, all the secondhand fast fashion I bought since college were disasters. Seams twist after a few wears, holes develop, they become progressively more sheer with every wash. If I don't want to wear a thrifted fast fashion item anymore, there's not much I can do with it. Consignment stores don't want them, and not all donations to thrift stores or textile recyclers end up where they are supposed to (often they are sent overseas, where they cause a myriad of ethical, environmental, and social problems).

      There is intrinsic value in designer goods. While a designer label may not guarantee quality, fast fashion encourages materialism and consumption too, and it's easier to buy and dispose of fast fashion items. With fast fashion, you don't have to love the garment. You don't feel the same pang when an H&M skirt rips or tears as you do when a Dior one does, and you don't feel the same urge to repair or care for a $40 jeans as a $200 one.

      I encourage secondhand shopping and keeping clothes out of landfills. If you're buying designer items secondhand and some items don't work for you, you have options to keep them from ending up as trash. Plus, at the end of its life cycle, a quality designer item has zippers, closely woven fabric, and parts that can be recycled more readily, as opposed to a badly dyed, heavily treated shoddy knit that can't even be used for industrial purposes.

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  28. Just noticed you are linked on Garance Dore :)

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  29. Ariana,

    Can you talk a little more about at home / lounge wear ? I cook and clean. And always change out of my street clothes. Into pajamas. Also, my cotton clothes absorb the smell of the indian spices. I have a set of dedicated clothes that I wouldn't mind if they are ruined. How do you manage ?

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    1. Hi Archana! My pajamas, black dress, leggings, grey t-shirt, and grey merino wool shirt are my house clothes. The wool and the modal don't absorb the smells of even kimchi or curries (which we eat a lot of) or cigarette smoke (from guests). I haven't noticed the smell on my grey t-shirt but that could be because it contains a small percentage of elastane. For now the clothes are nice enough that I could leave the house in them or answer the door for unexpected guests and not be embarrassed. At the same time, they are washable and if they get ruined, I don't care. I use them to garden and shovel snow when I visit my family in the US, when I'm painting a friend's apartment or doing ceramics, and wear them the few times I go to the gym :) Hope this helps!

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