Simplifying My Beauty Routine


This post has been updated. Click here to read the updated post.

Our bathroom looks empty because it is. Step into the shower and there's nothing but a soap dish, bar of savon de marseille, and amber glass bottle containing my husband's shampoo. On the sink rest two bamboo toothbrushes, bar soap, and a glass bottle of homemade mouthwash. In my drawer, a wooden brush, safety razor, siwak and little jar of baking soda. I no longer need moisturizer for my face, but if I'm feeling a little dry- which is hardly ever- I slather olive oil on my hands and legs. It wasn't always like this- when we first moved here, our bathroom was a mess of Aesop bottles and Nivea cream. The pursuit of beauty was more costly than I thought.

For centuries, it seems, people struggled to keep their beauty routines simple. Early tomb paintings, decorated shells, and tiny wooden spoons unearthed by archaeologists suggest the widespread use of cosmetics in ancient cultures, which involved a lot of harvesting, mixing, and grinding. Olive oil-based perfumes appear to have a long history in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Middle East- since water was scarce in that part of the world, scented oils were used to protect and beautify the skin. Traces of soap were discovered in ancient Babylonian urns (historians believe they only used it to treat skin diseases), yet according to Roman legend, soap originated when rain washed animal fat and wood ashes down Mount Sapo. The profusion of facial care products didn't occur until fairly recently- in 1916, German scientists utilized synthetic detergents to cope with wartime rationing. Subsequent decades saw companies like Unilever scurrying to create new facial creams, cleansers, and gels with cheaply-manufactured syndets. Now a multibillion dollar industry, beauty executives and advertisers today play on insecurities, conditioning people to think achieving a certain level of success is only possible if you use their products.

I fell for it. What started out as a mild case of acne became a crippling, depressing explosion of zits thanks to all the harsh chemicals, detergents, and silicones.  Unable to hide under makeup, I didn't want to leave the apartment- not easy when you have a job and a social life. The painful cysts, bleeding, and peeling I experienced under dermatologists' care intensified while using EpiDuo, Proactiv, and Retin-A. I went to Clarins, fistful literally of dollars, and they turned me away; worst of all, Accutane caused liver damage still evident on my skin today. Whereas products- even natural ones, like baking soda (too abrasive), oil cleansing (too drying), or RMS Beauty cosmetics (horrible breakouts, although lots of people love them)- seemed to worsen matters, now I can smile and face the world without feeling like a complete monster. I went from using conventional shampoo, conditioner, silicone based serum, gels, and hairsprays to co-washing, then baking soda and vinegar, and bar soap. I tried Clinique's three-step routine, Clearasil's, and a dozen home remedies from honey and ACV to clay; innumerable pore refiners and strips, and caffeine treatments for my undereye circles. Water only is the one routine that seems to make any improvement.

Though I still have a long ways to go, my skin finally feels nice, not itchy or tight or swollen. It looks less diseased. My pores, enlarged by EpiDuo, are noticeably finer. I don't think water only is for everyone, and I don't think I'm going to do it forever- while I've appreciated the opportunity my hair had to heal, I think I'll need gram flour in the future. Beauty routines are very personal and I can't tell you what you should or shouldn't use. If you love using cosmetics and products and it's how you experiment and express yourself, then by all means, enjoy them! But if, like me, you're sick of everything and thinking about trying water only, here's what I've noticed:

Water Only for Skin / Acne

  1. This isn't a quick fix. It's a months-long process. I hampered my progress by using a hemp washcloth to cleanse everyday, when it's better not to scrub skin. Simply splash thoroughly, wash with hands in a downward motion, and pat dry. Exfoliating thins skin, making you more susceptible to sun damage. Dead keratinocytes, which act as a barrier between an organism and the environment, serve an important immune function, slough autonomously, and physically remove colonizing bacteria. Removing them manually upsets skin's delicate balance.
  2. Water only doesn't prevent breakouts, but the ones that form are smaller and heal faster. Longtime acne marks and scars began fading almost immediately after starting this routine.
  3. Skip AM washing. Water only seems to normalize sebum production so I stop overproducing oil, but I need to hang on to that moisture to get through the day. My skin is really glowy and nice-looking in the mornings, although this disappears when I stand outside for awhile. Too much washing will dry skin out and disrupt the skin's natural protective barrier.
  4. Get active. My husband says, regretfully, my skin looks better after an intense game of football, during which I almost inevitably kick him or someone he cares about really hard in the shins. That's because it's not natural for us to sit in front of a computer or in our cars all day, sedentary. Exercise helps tone and plump skin with volatizing muscle, promoting a younger, fresher appearance. Don't worry, you can splash your face with water after a workout.
  5. Don't stress and don't pick! Avoid the mirror if you have to. Relaxing and not thinking about my skin seems to help me stave off breakouts, which one doctor told me were cortisol-induced.
I don't know how this skin care routine works with people who wear makeup. I imagine you would need a washcloth or something to take it off, which would be abrasive and potentially skin-damaging. I've read that some just rinse their face under a shower for a few minutes, but that's 25 gallons of water per minute! Some formulations are easier to remove than others, I guess. 

Water Only Hair Washing

  1. Try to stretch the time between washes. This was so hard, but when I pushed past the first few days of grossness, I woke up and brushed my hair suddenly to find that it looked nice. Fluffy, bouncy, not overly shiny. Too much washing can be incredibly drying.
  2. Scalp massage is crucial. This is going to sound counterintuitive after all the keratinocyte jibber jabber, but I think if you don't clear out the dead skin, things start to smell. It seems stimulating circulation and working sebum through my hair is why I haven't experienced the issues other people describe on water only forums, and it's really improved the texture and look of my hair- noticeably less frizz, responds better in humidity, more volume, etc.
  3. I haven't needed to wear scarves or tie my hair up- although I probably should, to protect my hair from Paris filth- but at night I protect my pillowcase with a scarf or towel. I wash my pillowcases once a week, and my brush more frequently, because it gets dusty (something I only experienced here, even when co-washing).
I'm never going to give up bar soap in the shower, but it seems staying away from products and surfactants allows skin and hair to heal, however slowly. My husband now says my hair is "fixed" and confessed, "I was really worried for awhile." Lately, he compliments my hair every day, and assures me it doesn't smell- he would be the first to say something. Perhaps my progress has stagnated a bit since last month. I could use a cut- I cut it myself, with a safety razor.

Sources


Merkur razor
Siwak from Marrakech, available at Buly
Wood and rubber brush, similar here
Savon de Marseille or Aleppo soap, purchased unpackaged at Bio'c'Bon or farmer's markets

This post contains ShopStyle affiliate links. If you click on them, I may make a small commission. Thank you for your continuing support!

Paris to Go

49 comments:

  1. Thankfully I've had pretty decent skin, but have always been lazy (and cheap) around the myriad of facial cleansing products and don't use any and just rinse with water in the shower. Now that I'm post-40 I'm anxious that maybe I should be doing more but it's reassuring to read what you had to say about the negative effects of exfoliation. I do use a moisturizer with sunscreen but would like to find something more natural than the one I use, and I rarely wear any makeup (again, lazy). Anyway, thank you for making me feel better about being lazy and not succumbing to the beauty industry's crap about miracle skin products!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's so good to hear Jen! I read all these studies and it seems like most of these "anti-aging" products are just snake oil. Did you see this report on sunscreen:

      http://www.ewg.org/2015sunscreen/report/executive-summary/

      I get so scared when I read stuff like that. You've probably kept your skin nice by just using water!

      Delete
    2. Ugh, fantastic to see how things that are supposed to keep us "healthy" might be hurting us more than they help.I'll have to check out their recs on best moisturizers with sunscreen to replace the one I'm using.

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    4. Hi there :) I use wheat germ oil ('tarwekiemolie' in Dutch) on my face to moisturize and protect it againt sun damage. It has a natural sunblock of 15 SPF, which is not that high so you maybe have to use it more often. It's a very light oil, which is perfect for my sensitive skin, and not very shiny. In Holland it is not expensive at all, about 5 euro per bottle (250ml). I use it on my whole body for protection in summer, and in winter only when I have dry skin.

      Delete
    5. Jeanette, thanks for the suggestion! I just read about their SPF after you posted this. Amazing!

      Delete
  2. Glowing skin! I'm sure your eating plan helps you along great to. I have the driest skin ever, but I have found a mixture which is cheap and a hell of a lot more effective than store bought stuff. I mix rose water, rice bran oil and a few drops of sea buckthorn oil and my skin is in heaven. Also great to remove make-up (sorry for my vanity). This mixture sets me back not more than 10€ per year. The winner over water for me. I just like it when you cheat the consumerism with something that works out even better.



    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Emma, you always have the coolest beauty recommendations. I've heard wonderful things about sea buckthorn oil. I'm sure I could get it here, I just don't know where. Your mixture must smell amazing! If you ever want to do a guest post on your beauty routine let me know :)

      Delete
    2. Hi Emma what is your ratio for your rose water mix? and how/how often do you use it?

      Delete
    3. Thank you for asking. I fill up a bottle with about 2/3 of rice bran oil. Then I add rosewater and top it off with sea bucktonrn oil drop until luscious golden colour appears. Hope this can help you.

      Delete
    4. Thank you for asking. I fill up a bottle with about 2/3 of rice bran oil. Then I add rosewater and top it off with sea bucktonrn oil drop until luscious golden colour appears. Hope this can help you.

      Delete
  3. That link is helpful and I'm glad to see my sunscreen, La Roche Posay, ranks well. May I ask, what is "co-washing"? Thanks for this- one of my favorite topics you cover though I am no where near this streamlined. It's nice to have something to aim for at least!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Darcy, oh good, I'm glad yours works! Cowashing is washing with conditioner only. I had no idea what it was either. Even after I started I didn't even know that was the word for it. I think mine wouldn't be so streamlined if I weren't so desperate! I think I've run out of options. Beauty routines are so personal, as long as you have something that works, that's great for you :)

      Delete
  4. Love the research on history of soap. Very interesting.

    I use gram-flour everyday for bathing and swear by it. I hope you do too, one day. My great-grad-ma, grandma and me do.

    I have to confess, I use random beauty products out of curiosity and not to treat any concern. I have been phasing them out but its still a little scary to think I wont do anything to my face.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Archana! You actually raised a point I meant to put in this post. Some people really enjoy using beauty products, and that's great. It's a fun way to experiment and a nice diversion. For me, it was just a burden so I decided to scrap them all haha- a little extreme, maybe, but I'm feeling better. I haven't met one person who doesn't love gram flour, glad to hear your review! And so cost-effective too. I think I will try it for sure when I get back to the US.

      Delete
  5. Ok this gram flour thing is new to me. I've never heard of using that- definitely interested in what that's all about!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. People use it for facials, to wash their hair, even to remove facial hair. It's amazing! I think it's used a lot in Ayurvedic beauty treatments. In Asia they use it to minimize pores and whiten their skin. It's good for oily hair and scalp too.

      Delete
  6. Thanks for another great post. I have always just used water to wash my face, but always felt bad about it. There is a whole world of ads and people telling us why we have to use all these fancy products and I believed them. So sometimes I would by a product but after a while I would forget to use it and go back to water only. It was only last year I realized that it's ok; I don't need to wash my face with anything but water. Feels great!

    I use makeup (foundation and a little mascara) and just remove it with a washcloth. I see you wrote this could be skin damaging, could you please explain this? Would be great to know more!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Camilla! I should have worded that differently I think. It seems exfoliation makes skin more photo sensitive. So the sun is more damaging than a washcloth. But it sounds like you're doing this at night, so it's not a problem! For acne like mine, dermatologists kept telling me not to scrub, just to be gentle with it- but I kept using a washcloth because I felt like I could scrub the acne away, so not true. That's amazing you always just used water! I'm glad to hear it works great. It gives me hope that there's light at the end of the tunnel!

      Delete
    2. Thanks for clearing that up for me, Ariana! :)

      Delete
  7. Thanks so much for your interesting post, as always! I'm so inspired to streamline my beauty routine now. Since stumbling across your blog three weeks ago I've already culled more than half my wardrobe so that my husband and I can fit all of our clothes into one wardrobe and get rid of the other one, freeing up space. Now I'm keen to do the same with my toiletries. It feels very liberating somehow not to need fancy, expensive creams and products. I did try making my own foundation, but it ended up sticking to my clothes and eyebrows, but not to my face, so I need to keep working on it. ;-) I've just started washing my hair with a bar of goat milk soap, and it does feel very nice afterwards, but is hard to brush, since I didn't use conditioner. I will try your suggestion of scalp massage to see if that helps.
    Thanks again,
    Jane

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jane! The goat milk soap sounds wonderful. Let me know if the scalp massage does help! How cool that you tried your own foundation, which recipe did you use? Yea I didn't have much success, I just tried powder foundation with nutmeg, it was always a little too light and whitened my eyebrows, and looked funny :(

      Delete
    2. Well, I pretty much just mixed arrowroot powder with a bit of cocoa and cinnamon and added a few drops of almond oil. The plus side was that I loved smelling like a cookie all day, but I would have preferred more of it to actually stay on my face. :-)
      I just read an article about using diluted apple cider vinegar as a conditioner, but I think I might have read in one of your posts that it wasn't very good for your hair - was that the case?

      Delete
    3. Yes, I loved the cookie smell of homemade cosmetics, unfortunately the result... not so much. As a clarifying rinse, I liked ACV a lot, and white vinegar even better, but the baking soda hurt my hair so much, I think even ACV is too acidic for me. However I don't know enough about it to recommend that people try or don't try it. A bunch of readers just love ACV for their hair, some say it makes their hair to greasy. It did make my hair feel very soft and shiny, and the smell went away quickly- although the white vinegar smell was less overpowering to me.

      With soap, ACV might help balance out the alkalinity. Not knowing the PH of your soap I'm not sure though...this article might be more helpful:

      http://blog.kanelstrand.com/2014/01/baking-soda-destroyed-my-hair.html

      Delete
  8. Ever tried micellar water? A lot of derms say water is the cause of breakouts. It can strip skin's natural defenses. Micellar water was developed to help Parisians deal with the hard water. You can get it at the pharmacie and wipe it off with your washcloths.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, a lot of my friends use micellar water! Water doesn't touch their face at all in fact. Bioderma, Avéne, and La Roche Posay are literally in all of my friends cupboards. I don't think I can make it or find it unpackaged though. It's a great suggestion for people dealing with hard water though, thanks!

      Delete
  9. So far, I've only been able to wait two days between each shampoo without feeling like my hair is greased in oil. Most of the time, I wash every other day with a shampoo bar (especially in the summer), but would like to push my shampooing period to every 3-4 days or longer. Saving time and resources while having glossy smooth mane, yes please!

    Your other post on massaging the scalps and distributing the sebum along the hair inspired me to incorporate this practice into my hair care routine. But new habits are so tough to form and some days, I just feel lazy even though it feels so invigorating after a nice head massage! This new post renewed my determination to keep at it until it becomes a habit!

    As for my skin, frankly, I've finally learned (after trying many, many methods and hopes in a jar/pot/tube) that finding the right skincare products for my skin based on my understanding of my skin throughout the different seasons of the year, combined with SIGNIFICANT reduction in dairy intake are the two deciding factors in keeping my skin clear and smooth. I keep my skincare routine as simple as possible. I don't wear makeup at all (it ages me) except for the occasional concealer for minor blemishes. I also drink a ton of water and at least 8 hours of sleep every night. These are all important but right skincare and little to no dairy are the game-changers. It was very difficult to say no to food that contain dairy at the beginning (cake, cookies, ice cream, pizza, cheese, yogurt, frozen yogurt, etc.), but knowing how negative spotty skin makes me feel about myself, and how cranky I feel right from the start of the day, I realized that not consuming those food is worth my sanity and those around me. Nowadays, I no longer see it as a deprivation, but an active choice. I choose to not have dairy for my skin, and that's ok. I can also choose to have a little bit because matcha ice cream tastes yummy on a hot day, and that's ok too. I just make sure that I don't consume a large amount of it on any given day.

    I enjoy reading about your minimalism journey, Ariana. Your new posts are something I look forward to every week. This is my first comment (and a long one at that...) even though I started reading your blog a good while back. Keep on inspiring us!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Natalie! This is so helpful, I'm glad you shared it! Ooh and I'm happy the scalp massage is relaxing :) I keep forgetting to do it too. You're right about new habits!

      Giving up dairy is the hardest thing for me. I still crave it and the last time I followed a vegan diet, I did not miss it so much at this stage of the game. Sleep is something I definitely need more of... and matcha ice cream sounds amazing. Have you tried Professor Grunschnabel's matcha ice cream? It's dairy and soy free!

      I can really relate to the negative feelings. I can't believe something as inconsequential as a skin condition could affect my life so much. But it hurts physically and emotionally. Maybe I'm being a baby but it literally became my obsession. Water only really helped me face the world again, but, I do need to adjust my routine for the different seasons, a factor I hadn't considered yet.

      Thank you so much for sharing your story!

      Delete
    2. You're welcome!

      And that's the first time I've heard of Professor Grunschnabel. Their ice cream looks like a dream. I'll keep an eye out for them in NYC (where I reside), though I believe they only have stores in Europe. Thanks for sharing nonetheless!

      Delete
  10. You look gorgeous. I'm glad you found a routine for yourself. I used to have acne until I figured out that water only in the morning and coconut oil wiped off with a warm washcloth at night were all I need.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Kathleen! Thank you so much for sharing. How long did it take your skin to adjust to water only? It seems to be the only thing that doesn't make my skin freak out! Glad to know your skin is all better.

      Delete
  11. Great post ! i appreciated he history of soap too.
    I used to have a " layering " routine, it was great for the skin but very time consuming.
    Now i only use castille soap and water, and sesame oil.
    I recently switch to castille soap for my hair too and they look healthier and thicker !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah, what is a layering routine, if I might ask? Glad to hear castille soap works for your hair! That is awesome. I love the feel of sesame oil, it makes skin look great.

      Delete
    2. It's a routine that comes from Japan as far as i know ; there is a lot of steps and products ( oil, soap, serum, ect ... )
      I use sesame oil for all my body, face to toes :)

      Delete
  12. Thank you for such an interesting and informative post. I visited your site while searching for tips on minimalist living, and yours is the first to provide concrete logic and explanations on how and why minimalist living can work. I'm about to embark on two years of semi-itinerant living, so it has been a huge help to downsize my wardrobe in particular. However, I'm afraid my wardrobe is far from being as minimalist as yours!

    Having an effective yet minimal beauty regimen is a constant challenge, so it is a bit daunting but refreshing to reflect on your current water-only approach. I know someone who pretty much has the same regimen, and he is a Korean traditional medicine doctor with a shaved head living in the mountains. He is in his mid 50s, runs marathons barefooted, and of course, has a very healthy diet, but he's not one to be boring so there's always room for a drink! French skincare experts always seem to emphasize the "no water" approach or eau thermale products to get rid of calcas (?) - your improving skin and hair suggest that what they recommend is more about marketing and less about what can actually help skin.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Ms, thank you for your sweet comment! That is awesome what you're doing, do you know where you will travel yet? What made you decide to do this? I'm so interested in your journey for the next two years haha if you ever want to do a guest post on how you decided to get rid of things and how it's going please tell me! And so cool about the Korean doctor, I can't wait to tell my grandma, he sounds like her haha. I think there's no reason a healthy diet can't include a nice drink :)

      Delete
    2. Thank you, Ariana. Yes, I will be traveling to Korea, then Japan. I am currently working on my Ph.D. so it is required as part of my fieldwork to do research abroad. I don't know if my process would be as inspiring/helpful as your posts or the guest posts, but perhaps it can serve as an example for those who are starting to make changes? I've definitely encountered some challenges when it comes to formal/professional vs. dressy/personal. Your grandma sounds like a cool lady. With regards to eating healthy, I see people here in the U.S. talking about kombucha happy hour... Well, more cocktails and wine for the rest of us!

      Delete
  13. Hi Ariana, first I want to say how much I love your blog. I have a long way to go but I am slowly simplifying my life and removing my attachment to belongings. It's such a pleasure to read your posts. I really like your writing style and always look forward to seeing your next post in my email. Also, I love this new blog layout. It's so simple and easy to navigate.

    I'm hoping you might have some suggestions for me. I'm still trying to figure out what works for my hair! I tried the baking soda and apple cider vinegar method for months and it did not work for me at all. I'm full Chinese and somehow I have extremely thick, wavy, yet fine hair. Hairstylists are a bit baffled by my hair. I know you're only using water now, but was there any shampoo you used that seemed to somewhat work for you? I'd love to know. Thank you very much!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, thank you so much! You are so sweet, I'm glad you like the new layout, I really wanted it to be easier to find stuff so I really appreciate the feedback!

      Baking soda and vinegar, ugh, I feel your pain. It really ruined my hair. Your hair sounds beautiful though! Aloe vera gel, straight from the leaf, really worked well for me. It's too expensive in Paris but my grandmother grows it here and I can't seem to trim the leaves fast enough, it grows so profusely. Anyway, if I lived in a country where aloe was more economical, I'd use the gel with a little water all the time. It left my hair squeaky clean and moisturized. I also recently tried a banana, at my grandmother's suggestion. It really cleaned my hair nicely and smelled so good! It leaves little bits of banana in your hair, but if you let it dry and then brush it out, it comes out completely and leaves your hair full and shiny.

      Aleppo soap works for me, but not in Paris because the water is so hard and doesn't rinse out. In areas with softer water, it leaves hair clean and silky.

      Delete
    2. Thank you so much for replying! I'm going to try everything you suggested. My grandmother loves her gardening so I'm sure I can convince her to grow some for me ;) Aleppo soap is probably the more difficult one to locate but I live in New York where anything can be found if one looks hard enough. Again, I really appreciate you taking the time to make these suggestions!

      Delete
  14. I can't thank you enough for this post. My skin had been absolutely horrible for about a year before I read this. I was so confused, all my life I'd had really great skin until this point! I was obsessively picking at my skin and trying anything to resolve the blemishes (cortisol-induced...go figure). I was at a point where I was exfoliating daily just to feel like I was doing SOMETHING for my skin. When I read your post and stopped using everything but water, I was a little skeptical...but at a point where I was going to try anything that may help. After just a month, my skin looked so much better. I don't allow myself within 2 feet of a mirror now so I can avoid picking. It's only been two months, but my skin is almost completely back to its normal self. I'm glowing, I look so much younger, and I'm absolutely thrilled that my skin will be beautiful for my wedding in May. Thank you so much ❤️❤️❤️

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Abigail, that is wonderful! I'm so happy to hear that. Congratulations on your wedding! How stressful to have to deal with skin stuff when you just want to enjoy getting married. I was so desperate and confused about my skin before too and can't believe what a difference only water makes.

      Delete
  15. I do wonder though. I've been trying to use only water to clean my face at night, with make up, and a simple wash cloth does not seem to do the job. Is it the hemp that works the miracles?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Emma! I don't think it's the hemp because I use a cotton washcloth three nights a week. My makeup is silicone and the rest is homemade so maybe that's why it comes out so easily?

      Delete
  16. Ariana, it's been a joy to spend time here at your blog, particularly with the water-only hair washing/head massage information; I use a wood comb which seems to bring a positive result. For the skin, teeth, and eyeliner,I've also experimented with creating activated charcoal, and with peanut shells the process seems to take less time to char. Thanks for the beautiful photos and good writing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so sweet, I'll have to try peanut shells, that is an awesome tip! And I have a lot of peanut shells lying around usually. Thanks for sharing your experience :)

      Delete
  17. You mentioned that you cut your own hair- do you have any tips? I have really thick hair and I'm nervous to cut my own hair.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would say don't do what I do :) I use a razor because hairstylists always used one on my hair, to thin it out and trim the ends, but I read online that using a razor causes ends to fray faster. My hair is really thick and coarse as well. I just put it in a ponytail, flip it over, and razor off the ends. I use this method for layering: http://www.makeupbydeendal.com/our-blog/my-diy-layers-haircut

      Delete
  18. The baseball world grieved the passings in June of baseball symbol Don Zimmer (June 4) and Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn (June 16)..Although they kicked the bucket before in the month, the media consideration encompassing their passings still dominated the later going of Arthur William "Dutch" Schult. He was eighty-six years of age. Throneberry of Mets lore

    ReplyDelete